Album Review: Megan Henwood – River

Megan Henwood’s third album ‘River’ is due to be released on 27th October, and it is worth getting your copy as it doesn’t disappoint. Henwood’s first two albums are more than satisfactory, but I think it is fair to say, River is her most mature and addictive album to date.

With Henwood’s delicate, easy listening vocal tones, ingenious lyrical content and innovative musical ideas, it is an album which requires several listens to appreciate the sheer beauty of it. The musical style is somewhat contemporary, and perhaps not traditionally of the folk genre, however it certainly holds its place in the market, with the high quality of tracks included.

I struggled to choose a highlight from River, purely because all of the tracks hold that something to keep the listener engaged. From the use of trumpet, organ, story-telling and romance, Henwood finds a variety of ways to catch and hold our attention.

The opening track ‘Join The Dots’ is a very catchy number, with a familiar feel. It is a great introduction to the album, simple yet effective, and one of my personal favourites.

Another highlight is ‘Apples’, with lyrics to make you think and feel, in their story like fashion. The vocal melody line is very pleasing. The viola and cello help to make this track stand out too, creating an atmospheric feel, especially in the instrumental section.

Finally, ‘Used To Be So Kind’ is a beautiful track. Henwood sings softly, oozing emotion. The song feels sad and reflective, with lyrics such as ‘Constant raising of the bar, forever fail to reach that far’. The song builds gradually, building the emotion, with interesting chord changes towards the end of the track to add variety.

In short, this album is pleasing on the senses from beginning to end, and leaves little, if any room for criticism. So it seems that the ‘constant raising of the bar’, has created great success.

Catch Megan on tour…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information please visit: http://www.meganhenwood.com/

 

Review by Emma Baldwin