Album Review: Andrea Terrano – Innamorata

Andrea Terrano is a world famous musician and composer who has spread his influence far and wide across the globe. Known primarily for his work with chillout and flamenco music he has worked alongside some of the worlds most talented artists such as Basement Jaxx and now we’re being treated to a rarer solo album to hear him in his purest form.

As you sit down and first listen to this self-titled album you could easily be forgiven for thinking that it was simply a beautifully raucous flamenco symphony on par with the quick-fire guitar medleys of Rodrigo e Gabriella but as you stop and allow the music to really sink in, it becomes something different. It becomes steadily more apparent that there is something much deeper hidden within Terrano’s work, something that is immensely familial and passionate. His music is playful and tender but each and every chord is struck with something that borders on reverence. It is the music of a man who doesn’t simply respect the instrument he plays but every sound it makes. There is a rich, vivid flow of life that leaves you dancing along with every note.

However, what elevates his music to greater and greater heights are the wonderfully grandiose elements afforded to it by the inclusion of what sounds like a full scale orchestra behind him. In a wonderful experimental fusion Terrano bends the edges of orchestra and flamenco and tames a whole new beast the produces a wildly vibrant and uplifting series of tunes that are nothing short of life-affirming. Everything produced on the album feels as though it has been produced with a burning passion and that is exactly how you can listen to it.

With such a rich music heritage at his fingertips and years in the industry honing his skills to perfection it’s no surprise that Andrea Terrano has produced such a soothing, stunning and astounding album. This is the album equivalent of Chicken Soup for the Soul.

To purchase the album please visit:https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/innamorata/id1147930970

Review by Joe Knipe